Crasher Policy:

Enrollment is limited to 30 students in Zoology 200, 203 and Microbiology 200 courses, and seats are limited to 32 students. I enroll to a maximum of 32 students in each class. This is for both safety concerns and to maintain the integrity of the educational environment.

1. On the first day of the class, roll is taken approximately 30 minutes after the start of the class. Enrolled students MUST be in attendance at this time. Individuals who are ‘no-shows’ are dropped and the appropriate number of spaces are calculated (e.g. if 1 person is a ‘no show’, then I have 1 spot plus 2 extra seats = 3 openings).

2. I then call roll from my waitlist, which holds 20 students, in SEQUENTIAL ORDER. Students are then selected from the waitlist IN ORDER on my roster. For example, consider the following waitlist roster.

Waitlist Position #1 Eager Student

Waitlist Position #2 Shopping Student

Waitlist Position #3 Patient Student

Waitlist Position #4 Hopeful Student

Waitlist Position #5 Late Student

Waitlist Position #6 Begging Student

Ect…..

When I call roll, let’s say that Eager Student, Dedicated Student, Patient Student and Begging Student are all present. Shopping Student and Late Student are not present. My waitlist now looks like this.

Waitlist Position #1 Eager Student

Waitlist Position #2 Shopping Student

Waitlist Position #3 Dedicated Student

Waitlist Position #4 Patient Student

Waitlist Position #5 Late Student

Waitlist Position #6 Begging Student

Ect…..

3. At this point, I now offer an enrollment code to the first three attending students on my roster, which are Eager Student, Dedicated Student and Patient Student. I now have 32 students enrolled, which is the maximum number of students allowed in these classrooms. As you can see, Begging Student was not offered a spot due to his/her position lower on the waitlist. No amount of "begging" changes this situation.

What does this mean for you, the "crasher"?

1. If you are on the waitlist, you must show up the first day of class to be considered.

2. If you are high on the waitlist, your chances are good. If you are low, your chances are poor.

3. If you are not on the waitlist at all, your chances are zero. To be considered, you must be on a waitlist.